TICKETS

Order Online

Beginning December 9, 2021 @ 8 A.M.
through March 13, 2022.
Online ordering available 24/7.

For Ticket Information

Phone Orders
OPEN, 8 a.m.- 8 p.m. EST.
813-754-1996

813-719-6680, ADA and Group Sales

 

 

 

Amscot Main Ticket Office

(813) 754-1996, main office line
(813) 719-6680, ADA seating and group sales

Beginning December 9, 2021 @ 8 a.m.

OPEN, Monday – Thursday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
CLOSED,  Saturday and Sunday

 

Discounted Admission Tickets at Publix

Click here for list of participating Publix stores.

Discounted Admission Tickets
$8 ages 13 and up
$4 ages 6 to 12
FREE ages 5 and under, with paid adult

 

John Anderson, $25

John Anderson, $25

When:
March 7, 2022 @ 3:30 pm
2022-03-07T15:30:00-05:00
2022-03-07T15:45:00-05:00
Where:
Florida Strawberry Festival
303 BerryFest Place
Cost:
$25.00
John Anderson, $25 @ Florida Strawberry Festival

As a child growing up in Apopka, Florida, Anderson remembers humming along to the tone of his father’s boat motor. He started his music career performing solo around Florida before moving to Florida. He worked in construction – he was on the roofing crew for the new Grand Ole Opry House – before landing a contract with Warner Bros. Records. After charting modestly in the late ‘70s, Anderson scored No. 1 hits in the ‘80s with “Wild and Blue,” “Swingin’,” and “Black Sheep.” After a brief career lull, he staged a major comeback in 1992 as “Straight Tequila Night” became his first No. 1 single in nine years. That momentum carried him into the 2000s, giving him 60 charting country singles in four consecutive decades. “As a musician who lived this way, this job has always been so easy and so natural,” Anderson says. “I always have thanked God for never having to work, what I called work. I didn’t have to work too hard at it. It was a great way of living for me — and then it went away.” Married since 1983, with two daughters, Anderson leaned on his family to push through. For a year and a half, though innumerable doctor’s visits, he fought on a daily basis to heal. He remembers at his most desperate moment, he stood in the front yard of his acreage, let the rain wash over him, and told God, “I don’t really know how much more I can deal with. Please help.” Looking back at that moment, he says, “It was a matter of 48 hours I started getting better. And I’m telling you, I’m not here to be anything other than what I am, but the biggest thing I’ve gotten out of my whole experience is knowing how real my faith is.” During his period of recovery, Anderson got a phone call out of the blue from Auerbach, who was simply calling as a fan, inspired by a conversation with David Ferguson (co-producer) about great singers. When Anderson later met them both in person at Auerbach’s Easy Eye Sound studio in Nashville, they clicked as a unit immediately. On the spot, Anderson – a Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee — accepted an invitation to write the next day. That first co-write yielded “Years,” an emotional centerpiece of the album sung from the perspective of a man with some miles on him. “I recall thinking to myself, ‘This is a pretty good song,’” Anderson says. “But we know there’s a lot of good songs that get written, and a lot of them never get heard. Nevertheless, it was off to a good start.” Auerbach kept setting writing dates with collaborators like Joe Allen, Pat McLaughlin, and Paul Overstreet. At Anderson’s request, Auerbach sang the work tapes. Instantly recognizing the caliber of the songs, Auerbach offered to make an album with studio players like Gene Chrisman, Dave Roe, Russ Pahl, Billy Sanford, and Bobby Wood. Although he had produced or co-produced his own albums since 1981, Anderson put his trust in Auerbach. “I booked the session and here I’ve got a room full of musicians, and I really didn’t know if he was going to be able to hear in the headphones,” Auerbach remembers. “But we got him behind the microphone, he started singing and it was pure magic. His voice is like caramel magic coming out of those speakers.” Listening to Anderson’s vocals on Years, it would be impossible to guess that anything was amiss. Delivered in that distinctive, rich baritone, “Celebrate” provides a perspective of gratitude while “Slow Down,” “All We’re Really Looking For” and “You’re Nearly Nothin’” are some of the most eloquent love songs he’s ever recorded.